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Men who have sex with men sexual health quiz!


How much do you know about sexual health? See if you can score 10/10 on our quiz! Answers at the bottom of the page.


  1. You’re more at risk of HIV transmission if you’re a bottom rather than a top (assuming no protection is used), - true or false?

  2. What’s the average erect penis length in the UK (to the nearest inch)?

  3. Can an STI be passed on if you don’t ejaculate?

  4. What’s the most common STI amongst men who have sex with men?

  5. People on effective HIV treatment cannot pass HIV to other people – true or false?

  6. How often do the NHS recommend gay and bisexual men get a full STI test?

  7. All STIs have symptoms – true or false?

  8. Which type of lube should you not use with condoms, as it makes the latex deteriorate, increasing the likelihood of it breaking?

  9. What is PEP?

  10. What are the two things you should check on a condom packet before you should use it?


  1. True! Because anal tissue is very delicate it can be torn/damaged a lot more easily which gives the infection an easier path to your bloodstream.

  2. 5 inches. The average penis length when erect in the UK is 5.16 inches – a lot smaller than you see in porn isn’t it!?

  3. Yes STIs can be passed on before ejaculation, so make sure you use a condom to protect yourself against STIs.

  4. Gonorrhoea. Latest statistics from 2016 show there were 17,584 diagnoses of gonorrhoea in men who have sex with men. Chlamydia was the second most common with 12,900 diagnoses in men who have sex with men.

  5. True! Thanks to advances in treatment of HIV, if someone is on effective HIV treatment, they cannot pass the virus on to partners.

  6. Once every six months, or between each sexual partner.

  7. False! Chlamydia is an STI which often goes unnoticed and not everyone has symptoms with other STIs too, like gonorrhoea and HIV.

  8. Oil-based lube. Water-based and silicone-based lubes are both safe to use with condoms. Pick up free water-based lube and condoms from our Men’s Group!

  9. PEP is an emergency treatment that can prevent HIV infection after the virus has entered a person's body. Post-exposure prophylaxis is a month-long course of HIV drugs that someone takes within 72 hours of sex which had a risk of HIV transmission. PEP has side effects and isn’t available to everyone so it’s always best to use condoms as your first step to preventing STIs, including HIV.

  10. Date and safety kitemarks. Condoms have a use-by date on and two kitemarks showing they meet health and safety standards. The BSI and CE kitemarks look like the two symbols below:


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LGBT Stoke is a service provided by the Sexual Health Prevention Team from Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust